Superstorm At A Glance: New York state - Boston News, Weather, Sports | FOX 25 | MyFoxBoston

Superstorm At A Glance: New York state

Posted: Updated:

NEW YORK (AP) — Some key information about the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy in New York:

POWER OUTAGES: About 900,000 customers remain without electricity statewide, down from a peak of about 2.2 million Tuesday. Most continue to be in New York City, its northern suburbs and on Long Island. New York State Electric & Gas reported about 43,000 on Saturday and Central Hudson Gas and Electric had about 3,200.

EVACUATIONS: 375,000 people were ordered to leave flood-prone zones in New York City.

SHELTERS: About 5,500 people at 15 shelters Friday in New York City.

DEATHS: At least 47, including 40 in New York City. Deaths were attributed to falling trees, drowning, electrocution and car accidents.

CLOSINGS: All New York City schools remained closed Friday and all but 65 are expected to reopen Monday. Students at those schools will be relocated. Service in 80 percent of New York's subway system resumed operations, including the tunnels between lower Manhattan and Brooklyn. Some tunnels remained flooded. All Metro-North commuter rails resumed full service. The Long Island Rail Road commuter lines will have limited service on all of its lines. Rush-hour traffic into Manhattan remained restricted to vehicles carrying at least three people. All three of the city's major airports are open. Amtrak restarted modified service to New York City, including from Albany-Rensselaer.

HIGHLIGHTS: Gas rationing went into effect in northern New Jersey while crowds lined up at free fuel distribution sites in New York's boroughs before state officials said emergency vehicles had priority.

QUOTE OF THE DAY: "Thank God! I screamed and I put the lights on. Everybody was screaming. It was better than New Year's." Aida Padilla, 75, thrilled that the power had returned at her complex in New York City's Chelsea section.

  • New York State NewsNew York State NewsMore>>

  • Fitbit responds to data selling accusations

    Fitbit responds to data selling accusations

    Friday, August 22 2014 12:57 PM EDT2014-08-22 16:57:29 GMT
    The maker of a popular line of wearable fitness-tracking devices says it has never sold personal data to advertisers, contrary to concerns raised by U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer. San Francisco-based Fitbit said Friday that it has clarified its privacy policy to make it clear the company doesn't share information about its users. Schumer raised concerns about the company's privacy policy earlier this month and called for federal rules to allow consumers to protect their data.
    The maker of a popular line of wearable fitness-tracking devices says it has never sold personal data to advertisers, contrary to concerns raised by U.S. Sen. Charles Schumer. San Francisco-based Fitbit said Friday that it has clarified its privacy policy to make it clear the company doesn't share information about its users. Schumer raised concerns about the company's privacy policy earlier this month and called for federal rules to allow consumers to protect their data.
  • Torture video leads to kidnapping convictions

    Torture video leads to kidnapping convictions

    Friday, August 22 2014 8:00 AM EDT2014-08-22 12:00:26 GMT
    A jury shown the videotaped torture of a kidnapping victim has convicted the two men who held a man captive for 17 hours at a Buffalo home because they thought he was a police informant. Authorities say the two men kidnapped a 25-year-old crack addict they accused of being a snitch. Video from Dawson's cellphone shows a gun being shoved into the victim's mouth and the victim being forced to lick his own blood off the boot of a captor.
    A jury shown the videotaped torture of a kidnapping victim has convicted the two men who held a man captive for 17 hours at a Buffalo home because they thought he was a police informant. Authorities say the two men kidnapped a 25-year-old crack addict they accused of being a snitch. Video from Dawson's cellphone shows a gun being shoved into the victim's mouth and the victim being forced to lick his own blood off the boot of a captor.
  • Zoo feeds roadkill to animals

    Zoo feeds roadkill to animals

    Thursday, August 21 2014 9:07 AM EDT2014-08-21 13:07:23 GMT
    Roadkill is part of the menu when it's feeding time at a zoo in western New York. The Seneca Park Zoo has been feeding deer carcasses to its carnivores for years. The practice began after a zoo employee hit a deer on the way to work. The zoo gets the deer after they've been hit by vehicles on Rochester-area roadways. But it won't accept deer that have been dead for more than 10 hours. The zoo also accepts deer killed by bow hunters.
    Roadkill is part of the menu when it's feeding time at a zoo in western New York. The Seneca Park Zoo has been feeding deer carcasses to its carnivores for years. The practice began after a zoo employee hit a deer on the way to work. The zoo gets the deer after they've been hit by vehicles on Rochester-area roadways. But it won't accept deer that have been dead for more than 10 hours. The zoo also accepts deer killed by bow hunters.

Powered by WorldNow

25 FOX Drive
Dedham, MA 02026

Phone (781) 467-2525

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | New Terms of Service What's new | Ad Choices