President Obama wins re-election - Boston News, Weather, Sports | FOX 25 | MyFoxBoston

President Obama wins re-election

Posted: Updated:
  • ElectionsMore>>

  • Title of new Hillary Clinton book: 'Hard Choices'

    Title of new Hillary Clinton book: 'Hard Choices'

    Friday, April 18 2014 8:30 AM EDT2014-04-18 12:30:58 GMT
    Hillary Rodham Clinton's publisher says her upcoming book on her role as President Barack Obama's secretary of state will be called "Hard Choices."
    Hillary Rodham Clinton's upcoming book will be called "Hard Choices," a title that reflects how the potential 2016 presidential candidate may try to define her record as President Barack Obama's secretary of state...
  • UK opposition party hires top Obama adviser

    UK opposition party hires top Obama adviser

    Friday, April 18 2014 6:11 AM EDT2014-04-18 10:11:15 GMT
    Britain's opposition Labour Party has recruited a top adviser to U.S. President Barack Obama's campaigns to help with its leader's election bid next year.
    Britain's opposition Labour Party has recruited a top adviser to U.S. President Barack Obama's campaigns to help with its leader's election bid next year.
  • Obama: 8 million signed up for health care

    Obama: 8 million signed up for health care

    Friday, April 18 2014 1:01 AM EDT2014-04-18 05:01:04 GMT
    Eight million people have signed up for health care through new insurance exchanges, President Barack Obama said Thursday, besting expectations and offering new hope to Democrats who are defending the law ahead of...
    Eight million people have signed up for health care through new insurance exchanges and the proportion of younger applicants has increased, President Barack Obama said Thursday. The enrollments exceeded expectations and...

By JIM KUHNHENN and JULIE PACE
Associated Press

CHICAGO (AP) - A triumphant President Barack Obama heralded his re-election with a call to action early Wednesday, telling Americans that their citizenship doesn't end with their vote and declaring that the "best is yet to come."

Obama offered a call for reconciliation after a divisive election, but he also defended the freewheeling nature of politics and said big decisions "necessarily stir up passions."

Obama says he wants to meet with Republican rival Mitt Romney to discuss how they can work together and said he was willing to work with leaders of both parties to tackle upcoming challenges. Of his contest with Romney, he said they may have "battled fiercely, but it's only because we love this country deeply."

Obama made clear he had an agenda in mind, citing changes in the tax code, immigration and, as he put it, an America "that isn't threatened by the destructive power of a warming planet." More immediately, he and Congress need to negotiate a new fiscal plan that avoids massive cuts in defense and other domestic spending and sharp across-the-board tax increases. Obama has called for tax increases on households earning more than $250,000; House Speaker John Boehner has rejected any tax increases.

Hinting at fights to come, he said politics and attacking problems inevitably stir controversy. "That won't change after tonight and it shouldn't," he added. "These arguments we have are a mark of our liberty."

The president rolled to a second term over Romney, winning more than 300 electoral votes.

"Tonight in this election, you, the American people, reminded us that while our road has been hard while our journey has been long we have picked ourselves up, we have fought our way back and we know in our hearts that for the United States of America, the best is yet to come," he told an ecstatic crowd in the cavernous McCormick Place convention center on Chicago's lakefront.

Obama appeared about two hours after he was declared the victor in his re-election bid and less than an hour after Romney offered a cordial concession. The two men spoke by phone and Romney, in his own speech to supporters, said he prays "the president will be successful in guiding our nation."

Obama took the stage with first lady Michelle Obama and daughters Sasha and Malia. When he finished he was joined on stage by Vice President Joe Biden, whom Obama called "America's happy warrior," and Biden's extended family. In his remarks he paid special tribute to his campaign team and his volunteers as the best "in the history of politics. The best. The best ever."

"Thank you for believing all the way through every hill, through every valley," he said. "You lifted me up the whole way."

Dozens of Obama and Biden staffers gathered on the floor next to the stage for the speeches. Many stood with their arms around each other, some wiping away tears, as the president spoke.

As Obama was waving to the crowd one last time, Biden and his family walked off stage. Then the vice president peeked back around the blue curtains and gave a big wave and a grin to the cameras.

Campaign manager Jim Messina lingered on the floor long after the president left the stage, hugging friends in the crowd and wiping away his own tears.

The president's team had projected confidence for days, but nervously watched the election returns roll in Tuesday night. Even as the race appeared to be turning in Obama's direction, the staff was narrowly focused on Ohio, the Midwest swing state where Obama and Romney competed fiercely.

Despite their outward cool, Obama and his aides left nothing to chance. The president indulged his superstitions by engaging in a traditional Election Day basketball game with friends during the afternoon.

Obama's team won - his first victory of the day.

Powered by WorldNow

25 FOX Drive
Dedham, MA 02026

Phone (781) 467-2525

Didn't find what you were looking for?
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Fox Television Stations, Inc. and Worldnow. All Rights Reserved.
Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Ad Choices