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Celebrities' nutrition influence

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From Gwyneth Paltrow's lifestyle website, goop.com, to Madonna's international chain of gyms, experts say the list of celebrities claiming to be health experts is growing.

Model Miranda Kerr recently launched her own healthy living webseries, "The Body Beautiful." Last week, actress Alicia Silverstone announced a breast milk bank for vegan moms on her blog, The Kind Life.

Celebrity expert David Caplan says this only extends a celebrity's relationship with their fan base.

"This is a huge dynamic of the relationship between a celeb and a fan," Caplan says. "It's aspirational, they want to see how the celebrity is living, what are they doing off the screen."

While these celebs are dishing out diet and healthy living tips, nutritionist Lisa Moskovitz says to take them with a grain of salt.

"Often times they'll say 'This is what worked for me, this is what my nutritionist gave to me, what my doctor gave to me, what my trainer gave to me... it'll probably work for you,'" Moskovitz says.

But still, these celebs are influential.

Kale prices reportedly rose by 40 percent in the U.K. after Paltrow and celebrity chefs promoted the veggie in recipes.

Thanks to Bethenny Frankel's Skinny Girl cocktail mixes, the low-calorie Skinny Girl margarita has become a staple at trendy restaurants and bars. 

Caplan says the only time an endeavor may backfire is when a celebrity hasn't researched it with a professional. 

"Gwyneth Paltrow, for example, she's come under fire because a lot of the medical professionals she's been associated with have not been deemed legit enough by other doctors," he says.

In terms of nutrition, Moskovitz says it's okay to grab some recipes from the stars, but think twice before cutting out major food groups.

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