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Grocery shelf sensors to gather shopper information

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High-tech shelves, equipped with built in sensors, could start to appear in grocery stores to identify us and get intelligence.

It's called retail surveillance and at least one company is moving forward with plans to track what you put in your cart.

The idea is coming from the company that owns mega brands like Chips Ahoy, Nabisco, Ritz, and other snack foods.

Mondelez wants to build a data-base of basic information about grocery store customers like age and sex, so it can better market its products.

The shelves use sensors based on Microsoft.’s gesture-based Kinect technology and if someone looks at the shelf long enough, the shelf’s display may play a video targeted for their demographic.

Product weight sensors will know when and what product has been picked off of the shelf and potentially offer a coupon.

The company says smart shelves won’t capture photos, video or any personal information because it won't take real images of people but will create avatar-like models to determine age and gender.

The company also says it will not keep database to match faces.


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