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Food sensors

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

For anyone watching their weight, it could be a perfect gadget - a key ring sized sensor that can tell you exactly how many calories are in your food simply by scanning it.

The small handheld gadget, which works with a mobile phone app, contains a spectrometer to analyze the chemical compounds in food.

From this, its Canadian inventors claim it can 'tell you the allergens, chemicals, nutrients, calories, and ingredients in your food'.

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