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Dangers of driving selfies

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NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) -

Well it's hard to believe this is actually a trend, but it is. You hop in your car, start driving. Then you reach for your cell and take a selfie. You post it on Twitter, Facebook or Instagram for everyone to see.

It is ridiculous and dangerous, but it's popular. It's estimated there are millions of driving selfies on Instagram and Twitter filed under hashtags like "#drivingselfie" and "#ihopeidontcrash."

Robert Sinclair Jr. of AAA New York says driving selfies are a major threat to safety because a distraction of just two seconds is sufficient to cause a crash, studies show.

To help deter driving selfies, Toyota has launched this ad campaign on Instagram: It's a crashed car with the message "don't shoot and drive."

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