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Coconut oil has many uses

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It seems everyone is either eating or putting the tropical fruit on their body these days. From coconut lotion, ice cream, and candy to butter.

Coconut has become a staple in Lisa Scharf's Upper West Side kitchen.

"It all started with my husband, he got this diagnosis of having a blood disorder," she said. "We didn't want to go through with the hardcore drugs. We wanted to do something with our diet and not make a drastic change."

They changed their eating habits and cook strictly with coconut oil. Since then, Lisa's husband's blood disorder is under control.

On today's menu, coconut flour chicken and Brussels sprouts sautéed in coconut oil. It was really good.

"It doesn't taste like coconut, still has great flavor," Lisa said.

So you might be thinking, 'How much is this going to cost me?' Every brand is different, but this coconut oil is about $30. A bottle of olive oil is about $20. But the coconut oil has a much longer shelf life; it can last up to two years.

Nutritionist Mary Ruth Ghiyam said coconut oil has been around since the beginning of time and has health benefits.

"Coconut is neutral and pairs well with all five categories of food so it helps greatly with digestion, which will lead to an increase in weight loss," Ghiyam said.

But consume it in moderation.

"You would want to have one to two tablespoons a day because it's still fat," she said.

It's also an anti-inflammatory and moisturizer, making it great for the hair and skin.

"It helps when you have eczema, psoriasis," said Annabelle Santos. "It helps to repair the skin, it helps to improve the texture."

So if you want to get in on the coconut craze, there are plenty of options out there.

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